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About

T-Vox is designed as a support and community website for transsexual, intersex and genderqueer people; people questioning their gender identity; and anyone with any other gender identity issues. We also welcome friends and family members of people who fit into any of the above.

The Areas on T-Vox

While originally designed as a wiki with a support forum attached, T-Vox has developed into a resource with three main areas: this advice site (which you are reading now), the news service and the chat room.

The Advice & Information Site

The advice site is the main focus of T-Vox. The primary goal of T-Vox is to create an extensive library of topics that cover every aspect of subjects relating to genderqueerness, intersexuality and transsexuality. We now have over 500 pages of information and resources and we recently launched our advice blog to provide more in-depth advice and information on specific topics of interest to our users’ real lives.

The News Service

T-Vox originally contained news articles within its wiki (which has now been retired in favour of the advice site) but this proved difficult to manage and it was eventually phased out. In November 2013, to mark the site’s 8th birthday, the news service was rebuilt on its own section of the site (t-vox.org/news). It is being phased in gradually.

The Chatroom

Because sometimes people want to chat in real time, T-Vox hosts its own chatroom via a Java client that links to an IRC server. This allows for myriad means of connecting to a stable, real-time chat system.

History

T-Vox was launched in November 2005 by Zoë Robinson and Jennifer Kirk. They created the site in response to there being no central site that contained all the information in one place that transpeople might need. They were also conscious that many support sites on the internet tended to be mtf-centric which in turn might put off transmen from making use of their resources.

The name T-Vox was chosen for the site because it does not jump out as an obviously a trans or LGBT website, thus it does not automatically “out” anyone by viewing it. The name comes from a “Pig Latin” corruption of “Transgender Voice”.

Over the course of late 2005 and the first half of 2006 the Wiki was expanded to include much information of relevance that included articles on hormones, legal issues and passing tips amongst others. Some of these articles were forked from Wikipedia, or several other small Wikis dealing in part with issues of relevence to transgendered people, whilst other articles were written from scratch based on research from books and databases.

By 2009 T-Vox had grown to become one of the principal online resources within its field on the internet. Many trans* activists have referred to it as “the trans Wikipedia”.